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Mark Twain: ADDRESS AT THE PILGRIMS’ CLUB LUNCHEON

Mark Twain Speeches presented by Conor Cunneen, a Chicago based humorous, motivational speaker who has learned from, and delights in the funny, (sometimes inspirational, sometimes poignant) humorous messages from possibly the finest and most famous motivational humorist ever.

Conor’s new book – What Mark Twain Learned Me ’bout Public Speakin provides wit and wisdom from the great man to help you craft better speeches and presentations.

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ADDRESS AT THE PILGRIMS’ CLUB LUNCHEON,GIVEN IN HONOR OF Mr. CLEMENS AT THE SAVOY HOTEL, LONDON, JUNE 25, 1907.    

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Pilgrims, I desire first to thank those undergraduates of Oxford. When a man has grown so old as I am, when he has reached the verge of seventy- two years, there is nothing that carries him back to the dreamland of his life, to his boyhood, like recognition of those young hearts up yonder.

And so I thank them out of my heart. I desire to thank the Pilgrims of New York also for their kind notice and message which they have cabled over here. Mr. Birrell says he does not know how he got here. But he will be able to get away all right–he has not drunk anything since he came here. I am glad to know about those friends of his, Otway and Chatterton–fresh, new names to me. I am glad of the disposition he has shown to rescue them from the evils of poverty, and if they are still in London, I hope to have a talk with them. For a while I thought he was going to tell us the effect which my book had upon his growing manhood. I thought he was going to tell us how much that effect amounted to, and whether it really made him what he now is, but with the discretion born of Parliamentary experience he dodged that, and we do not know now whether he read the book or not. He did that very neatly. I could not do it any better myself.

My books have had effects, and very good ones, too, here and there, and some others not so good. There is no doubt about that. But I remember one monumental instance of it years and years ago. Professor Norton, of Harvard, was over here, and when he came back to Boston I went out with Howells to call on him. Norton was allied in some way by marriage with Darwin. Continue reading