Substance + Humor to IMPROVE People, IMPROVE Performance, IMPROVE Productivity ENJOYABLY

Today’s Evocative Word from Mark Twain: CALLOW

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How Mark Twain Used Today’s Evocative Word – CALLOW – to get ’em evocating!

Source: Mark Twain speech delivered at a dinner given by the publishers of The Atlantic Monthly in honor of the seventieth anniversary of the birth of John Greenleaf Whittier, at the Hotel Brunswick, Boston, December 17, 1877.

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“This is an occasion peculiarly meet for the digging up of pleasant reminiscences concerning literary folk; therefore I will drop lightly into history myself. Standing here on the shore of the Atlantic and contemplating certain of its largest literary billows, I am reminded of a thing which happened to me thirteen years ago, when I had just succeeded in stirring up a little Nevadian literary puddle myself, whose spume-flakes were beginning to blow thinly California-ward. I started an inspection tramp through the southern mines of California. I was CALLOW and conceited, and I resolved to try the virtue of my ‘nom de guerre’.”

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 Above is an excerpt from possibly the most dramatic speaking event in the great humorist’s lengthy career. This was the night when Mark Twain BOMBED. “When I sat down it was with a heart which had long ceased to beat. I shall never be as dead again as I was then,” he wrote. 

 

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Go on! Purchase  – What Mark Twain Learned Me ’bout Public Speakin  from Conor Cunneen which provides wit and wisdom from the great man (Twain not Conor! to help you craft better speeches and presentations.

Mark Twain, long recognized as a wonderful author and humorist was possibly THE most successful professional speaker ever. He enthralled audiences from Berlin to Boston, from Montana to Melbourne with storytelling full of humor, pathos and humanity. He was regarded by many as an exceptional impromptu speaker, except he wasn’t! Twain worked diligently at his craft, researching, writing, rewriting and memorizing his material.

In this book, I showcase the words of Twain and his contemporaries via a unique MARK TWAIN acronym to highlight what Mark Twain Learned Me ’bout Public Speaking. The nine lessons provide a memorable and implementable framework for great speech making and presentation.

The MARK TWAIN acronym spells:

Message preparation

Audience

Relate to audience

Know your objective

Titter and humor

Wait (the Pause)

Anecdote

Involve

Narration and Stagecraft

ORDER Today:  What Mark Twain Learned Me ’bout Public Speakin