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Mark Twain on the Astonishing Teddy Roosevelt

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Chicago Motivational Speaker on Mark Twain and Teddy Roosevelt

In Suppose You Were an Idiot… Mark Twain on Politics and Politicians, I quote numerous comments from Twain (Sam Clemens) on US Presidents ranging from Washington to Teddy Roosevelt.

Twain was thoroughly intrigued by Teddy Roosevelt, but hardly a fan of his.

Here are some gems from Suppose You Were an Idiot… Mark Twain on Politics and Politicians

 

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Mr. Roosevelt is easily the most astonishing event in American history—if we except the discovery of the country by Columbus.

—Mark Twain: Eruption

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“Theodore the man is sane; in fairness we ought to keep in mind that Theodore, as statesman and politician, is insane.”

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Then we have tried for governor an illustrious Rough Rider, and we liked him so much in that great office that now we have made him Vice-President—not in order that that office shall give him distinction, but that he may confer distinction upon that office. And it’s needed, too—it’s needed. And now, for a while anyway, we shall not be stammering and embarrassed when a stranger asks us, “What is the name of the Vice-President?” This one is known; this one is pretty well-known, pretty widely known, and in some quarters favorably. I am not accustomed to dealing in these fulsome compliments, and I am probably overdoing it a little; but—well, my old affectionate admiration for Governor Roosevelt has probably betrayed me into the complimentary excess; but I know him, and you know him; and if you give him rope enough—I mean if—oh yes, he will justify that compliment; leave it just as it is.

     —Mark Twain Speeches: Lotos Club.

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“Certainly he is popular,” Clemens admitted, “and with the best of reasons. If the twelve apostles should call at the White House, he would say, ‘Come in, come in! I am delighted to see you. I’ve been watching your progress, and I admired it very much.’ Then if Satan should come, he would slap him on the shoulder and say, ‘Why, Satan, how do you do? I am so glad to meet you. I’ve read all your works and enjoyed every one of them.’ Anybody could be popular with a gift like that.” —Mark Twain: A Biography

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Conor Cunneen is also author

What Mark Twain Learned Me ’bout Public Speakin’

“When I say I’ll learn (‘Teach’ is not in the river vocabulary) a man the river, I mean it. And you can depend on it, I’ll learn him or kill him.” Life on the Mississippi  – Mark Twain

Utilizing a unique and memorable MARK TWAIN acronym, author Conor Cunneen demonstrates what the Dean of American Humorists learned him bout public speakin !

MARK ——– BEFORE you go on stage

Message preparation

Audience research and knowledge

Relate to audience

Know your objective

TWAIN ——— ON STAGE

Titter and humor wins the audience

Wait – The power of the Pause

Anecdotes connect

Involve, Inform, Inspire your audience

Narration and stagecraft.

BUY: What Mark Twain Learned Me ’bout Public Speakin’

Then we have tried for governor an illustrious Rough Rider, and we liked him so much in that great office that now we have made him Vice-President—not in order that that office shall give him distinction, but that he may confer distinction upon that office. And it’s needed, too—it’s needed. And now, for a while anyway, we shall not be stammering and embarrassed when a stranger asks us, “What is the name of the Vice-President?” This one is known; this one is pretty well-known, pretty widely known, and in some quarters favorably. I am not accustomed to dealing in these fulsome compliments, and I am probably overdoing it a little; but—well, my old affectionate admiration for Governor Roosevelt has probably betrayed me into the complimentary excess; but I know him, and you know him; and if you give him rope enough—I mean if—oh yes, he will justify that compliment; leave it just as it is.

     —Mark Twain Speeches: Lotos Club,
November 10, 1900

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Mr. Roosevelt is easily the most astonishing event in American history—if we except the discovery of the country by Columbus.

—Mark Twain: Eruption